Rob Riggle wants to give Indiana Jones a run for his money with Global Investigator

Rob Riggle wants to give Indiana Jones a run for his money with Global Investigator


– [Narrator] For centuries,
the world’s greatest mysteries have baffled the world’s greatest minds. But you should never send a
great mind to do a hero’s job. – When I pitched the show, the name actually just came to me. Call it divine intervention. I don’t know, but it just
came to me at the moment. And I said, Robert, Global Investigator ’cause it sounded funny to me. And guess what, that turned
out to be the name of the show. And it was so funny too ’cause while we were filming the show, all the paperwork had Global Investigator. And then they kept saying, well, but that’s just a placeholder. We’re not sure what the name’s gonna be. And yeah, it turned out.
– And there we have. – And there you have it, – [Cameron] Why are you a
better global investigator than Indiana Jones? – Well, Indiana had to kill people. I didn’t have to kill anybody. That was kind of nice. I think what we do is
actually the perfect mix of a real discovery
show where you get facts and history and mystery, and we bring in experts to give
us their theories and facts. So, we do some real work there, but then we put a little comedy pixie dust on top of it to hopefully
provide a new offering to the Discovery audience ’cause I am the Discovery audience. I love watching Discovery channel. And I’ve sat there and thought to myself, I’d like to see a show
with just a little comedy, just a little fun, a little light-hearted. But I still want my show. I still want to learn something. I still want to understand something. – [Narrator] One man’s gonna find answers. – [Rob] Is this a treasure map? – [Man] Not a treasure map. – Come on. I found something (laughs). I wanted to pick mysteries that I was sincerely curious about. And so I tried to make them
fact-based as best we could. There was some sort of
historical reference. There was some sort of touchstone in history that was real
that we could at least go to and be able to say look,
there’s either a preponderance of evidence that this is real, or there’s just enough
people talking about it that makes it real. That’s why we picked
things like the holy grail or the ninth legion or the cowboys’ gold or Black Caesar’s gold. Because people did try to
pitch, how about Bigfoot? And I was like, I don’t think so. I just didn’t think is was real. I didn’t think there was enough there. So I didn’t wanna do that. I want to do something fact-based. – [Cameron] Well, my dad
would argue with you. – I know, I’m gonna get a lot of pushback on saying that Bigfoot’s
not real, but it’s worth it. Well, it’s hammer time. Let’s go smash something. Come on, Carl. – Oh, okay. – [Cameron] On every mission,
I guess we’ll call them– – I love that, that’s works. – [Cameron] Yeah, that’s it. Are you finding different, how are you finding these
people that are going to kind of enlighten you on this journey? Where are they coming from? – We go to experts. Now, some of them are academic experts and PhDs who have dedicated
their life to reading and studying these phenomena or these legends or the
history of that timeframe. Some of them are local historians who are just been doing it in
their spare time for decades. But we do try to bring people
that have real expertise or a real understanding. There are guys that are treasure
hunters that are not PhDs. They’re actually pretty rough-cut guys, but they know their business, you know. And so talking to them, you can learn a lot
about treasure hunting, and you can learn a
lot about where to look and why to look and how
come we’re doing this and how come we’re doing that. I was an advocate for the audience. I’m asking questions I
sincerely wanna know answers to. Now, after we did a couple takes, then I’d crack wise a
little bit to have some fun or whatever, but it’s
usually at my expense, never at their expense, you know. ‘Cause I need them. I need their information. And I like challenging them. I like asking them, well, why? Why is this, and why is that? ‘Cause when I sit at home, and they don’t ask those questions, I’m like (groans) you
let ’em off the hook. Or you know, how do we know that’s true? That’s his theory. What is he backing that up with? After my 30-year stent as a
marine, comedian, and actor, I’m tackling the biggest
mysteries the world has to offer. – [Cameron] You’ve got this background. You were in the marines. You said you were training
to be a naval pilot, correct? – Uh-huh. – [Cameron] How did all
of that prep you for this? – A sense of adventure, definitely. I don’t think there’s
any direct crossover. I am scuba-certified, but I did that in my own civilian time. I didn’t do it through the military. And I didn’t have to do
any flying in the show, so that was good. I kept everybody alive that way. – [Cameron] I also noticed
you’re sporting a hat in a lot of the promos. Is the hat regulation
Global Investigator uniform? – I think so. I think so. We had a lot of fun with that ’cause there was a lot of debate. We were trying to debate on is he gonna wear one hat for everything, or we’re gonna be
situationally-driven hats. And I think we landed on
situationally-driven hats. So when I was in Greece, I
had the Greece tourist hat. When I was doing the cowboys’ treasure, the cowboy gold, I had on a cowboy hat. When I was doing the holy grail stuff, I had on kind of more of an Indian Jones. So, yeah, I think we’re gonna
do situationally-driven hats. So, hopefully I’ll find a
mystery that requires a fez. – [Narrator] He is Rob
Riggle, Global Investigator.

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