Pre-operative Bariatric Surgery Education Overview– Reston Hospital Center

Pre-operative Bariatric Surgery Education Overview– Reston Hospital Center


– Hi, welcome to the
Pre-operative Bariatric Surgery here at Reston Hospital. What this is gonna
cover is before surgery, the day of surgery, during your stay and as you prepare to go home. My name is Roz Barron. I’m the Bariatric Coordinator
here at Reston Hospital. I’m one of the nurse leaders, and you can expect a
daily visit from either me or one of the other nurse
leaders on the floor. My function is to work with the surgeon, the nurse and of course
you and your family. If you or your family have
any concerns or any comments, please feel free to let one
of us know while you’re here so we can make this a
very good stay for you. You are in safe, caring hands. We are accredited by the
Bariatric Accreditation of the MBSAQIP. It is the Comprehensive
Center designation, and we work together as a
team to best support you. So in preparation for your surgery, approximately three to four weeks, you need to see your doctor,
you need to go for any tests, make sure clearances are done. You need to stop smoking,
stop alcohol intake, if you’re female you need to
use appropriate birth control during this time because you will be, probably off your regular. Do schedule a pre-operative interview at least two weeks prior to. You can see the number on the screen, and typically you press one, and that will guide you
through very quickly. During the pre-operative appointment, they will go over your
medical and surgical history. Please have a current list of medications, including any over-the-counter, handy so that you can refer to that. Have also your orders from your surgeon, list of doctors, contact
numbers and pharmacy information because this too will be asked. You’ll be told at that time
if you need any other tests and how to prepare for the surgery. So the day of surgery,
what you’ll wanna do is bring a few things in,
like your ID, insurance card, any adaptive equipment such
as eyeglasses or hearing aids. If you would like, you can certainly bring your regular toiletries, loose
fitting clothes for after, and a favorite pillow
for comfort if you like. Do also bring your current
list of medications again. If needed, a CPAP mask, we
do use our own machines here, but please know your settings so that we can hook you
up to the correct setting. When you come in, you’ll need
to register first of all. That’s on the first floor
in 1850 Town Center. We’re open from 5:45
onwards, and please do arrive approximately two hours
prior to your surgery just to make sure that
you have time to register, sit down and then go for your surgery. You will be greeted by a pre-op nurse, by the anesthesiologist and surgeon. An intravenous catheter will be placed, and some blood might be drawn. And also the pre-operative
staff will take you, then, into the operating room. So after surgery, each surgery takes a
little bit different time, your surgeon will be able
to help you with this, anywhere between about
one and three hours, and then after that you’ll be
taken to the recovery room. Here you’ll have close monitoring. One of the things that
they will be asking you is about your pain level. So you’re gonna be seeing
a pain scale such as this, from zero to 10, zero
being no pain at all, 10 being the worst possible imaginable. And so they will be constantly asking you what your pain level is. Once when you’re cleared from this area, you will be transferred
to the fourth floor, which is the surgical unit. You will most likely be
groggily and in some pain once when you get up to the fourth floor. You will be greeted by a nurse, by me or another nurse leader, and you will be shown around the room to see how things work. One of the first things that I hear from most of the patients is that they do have some gas pain. One of the easiest way to get rid of the gas pain is by walking. We do have medications that
we could give you as well, but we’ll be emphasizing
the walking component of it. Your pain will be managed, and
please do let your nurse know if you do need some more medication. You can use your call bell or phone in order to get ahold of us. Vital signs will be taken once an hour for the first three hours, and then after that
approximately every four hours. Now unfortunately this does mean during the nighttime as
well, and I do apologize, but we do need to make sure that your vitals are all
good here in the hospital. So your diet, once when
you get up to the floor, depending on your surgeon and
the surgery that you’ve had, you may or may not be able
to have anything by mouth. You may be able to get some ice chips. You may be able to have a
small one ounce cup per hour. Now if you do get a one ounce cup, it’s not to just drink
it all the way back. You will be sipping very,
very slowly from this. So it usually takes about eight times to get through one ounce cup. So it’s just a little bit
of water in your mouth, and then just letting it go down. Where some patients do get
into a little bit of dilemma is when they have
medications by mouth as well. What I would suggest is put the medication right at the back of your
throat, tilt your head back and just a eensy weensy
little bit of water just to kinda help that go down. That will help to ensure
that you don’t get overfilled and have the consequences of that. You will be getting a
standard liquid tray, and that will be brought up. You’re gonna have a few
different suggestions on there. But once again, only one ounce per hour, either one ounce of the
water, one ounce of the broth, or one ounce of the diluted
apple juice, not one of each. And that’s when you first start out. Once again, sip slowly. Make sure that you do
consume the right amount, not too much. And we will be measuring your cups. So when you’re finished cup, usually you just turn it upside down and the nurse will be able to count that. You may need to stand up to sip as well, so if you’re having burping, hiccuping, any pressure or pain on your new stomach, I would definitely suggest
sitting up or standing up, and then gravity will help
bring it down as well. Blood work may be done
as early as four, 4:30, and this is so that the
surgeons will be able to see the lab work when
they come in in the morning. So unfortunately that is a little early, but just to give you a heads up that that does usually happen. How to recognize a nurse,
they will be in blue, and the techs will be in green. Nurses usually give you the medications and check your IV, things like that. The techs can help you with
blankets, if you need a walk, if you need your sequential
compression devices turned on. Sequential compression devices,
or SCDs go around your legs, and they just pump your blood so that you don’t get any blood
clots or anything like that. Once again, if you have a CPAP
machine please bring it in. We’ll hook it up, a mask, we’ll hook that mask up to the machine. You’ll also be using what’s
called an incentive spirometer. So that’s one of these. This is a breathing machine. You take this and you
breathe in like a straw, and then you watch it
go up in the middle here and also on the side. You’ll be using this 10 times
an hour while you’re awake, so you don’t have to do
it during the nighttime, but you’ll also be taking this home. What this does is it just
helps prevent pneumonia, and it gets that oxygen into
your lungs to help with that. And also, when you’re using
your incentive spirometer, you can also cough at the end, too. Sometimes you have a little bit of phlegm. When you’re coughing, I always suggest putting a pillow right on your abdominal area, and then that will help
ease any discomfort as well. You will be allowed to shower, however please be very
careful with your IV because I have seen quite a few come out. So depending on where the IV is, what we’ll do is we’ll put
a little plastic bag on it to protect it, but once again
we need to really protect that so that you don’t have to get a new one. We do have the SCDs, as I said,
to help prevent blood clots. Very important to have that
on while you’re in bed. So if we forget to hook you up, please just ask us to hook it up. We do have what’s called Musicure-music, and this is to help just ease you. It’s on channels 81, 82 and 83, and of course you can
choose any other channel, whatever you feel like when
you’re in the hospital. The nurse and the tech
will visit you regularly to make sure all your needs are being met. But once again, we’re just a
button away if you need us. You can expect to stay in the
hospital for a couple of days. Typically we want you to be drinking about four ounces an
hour before you go home. This is to make sure that you
are getting enough fluids. We don’t want you to go
home and not have enough. We want you to be hydrated, and if you’re not hydrating enough you may need to come back,
so we wanna make sure that you’re up to about
four ounces an hour before you leave. Don’t rush through this process. We want it to kinda trickle down, make sure you don’t
have any pain, pressure, hiccuping, burping,
anything like that, okay? If you do feel the
tightness pressure pain, you do need to stop and then
take in less the next time. And once again, standing
up or sitting up straight will also help with this. When the medication is given, please only take one pill at a time, the maximum five minutes in between, to once again make sure that you don’t overfill your new stomach. So discharge instructions,
so before you go home, I’ll be giving you discharge instructions. One of them is to do with incision care. One of the things that I
always say is make sure that you don’t rub your incision areas. Just pat it dry. Make sure you don’t take any baths. Don’t put any lotions on it. Just try to keep that area nice and clean. Activity, you will be
increasing your activity a little bit by little bit,
increasing your walking, increasing your drinking,
doing all of that. And of course safety is
always a huge concern. If you’re feeling dizzy at any time, just always make sure you sit down. We don’t want you falling. Signs and symptoms that should
be reported to the doctor, I’ll be going over some of these, such as blood clots, such
as a higher temperature if you’re taking Tylenol and it’s, you know, you’ve got a temperature, just give the doctor’s office a call. And anything that is uncomfortable, you can always give a call in
and we’ll be able to help you. Pain management of course,
we always wanna make sure that that’s managed. When you’re going home, you typically just take
over-the-counter Tylenol, that’s it. It’s once again you, the gas pain that is the most concerning
while in the hospital. Dietary instructions, you will be slowly increasing your diet over the next weeks. And we don’t want you to rush
through that process as well. And also when to follow
up with your doctor, usually two to three weeks
after you’re out of the hospital we’ll want you to phone up
and book another appointment. So what we’ve just done is
we’ve gone over the pre-surgery, what to do before you come in, the day of surgery kind of giving you idea of what to expect, and then of course the
plan for discharge home. Thank you so much for watching this video. Good luck on your surgery. And at the bottom of this,
there’s a little area to please put your name,
and also if you could put your surgery date
that would help us out. It’ll be good to see you. Thanks so much.

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