Is the Sleeve Gastrectomy Bariatric Surgery Procedure Right for Me?

Is the Sleeve Gastrectomy Bariatric Surgery Procedure Right for Me?


Hello. I’m Angela Munro and I am one of
the bariatric coordinators with MidMichigan Health’s Surgical Weight
Management program. When considering bariatric surgery, it’s
important to understand your surgical options. Listen to one of our bariatric
surgeons discuss the sleeve gastrectomy option. So next, we’ll talk about the
sleeve gastrectomy. So this is a laparoscopic procedure. This was actually the first stage of a two-stage procedure called the duodenal switch where
patients with a really high BMI – the plan was to do the sleeve gastrectomy first
and then they would do the second part which was the duodenal switch at a later
date. Well what they found for these patients is they often lost a fairly
significant amount of weight with the surgery of the sleeve gastrectomy alone
and many patients didn’t have to go back and have that second procedure performed. So it kind of grew into its own surgery. So this is easily the most common
surgery that’s now performed in the US for weight loss and part of that reason
is because, about four or five years ago most insurances started to cover it. So
that’s where it really helped it catch on. So the mean excess weight loss at three
years is about 66%. There’s no foreign body, no implanted medical device. And part
of the reason the surgery works is it does change the hormone signaling that
happens. There is a hormone in our body called ghrelin that stimulates our
appetite and at least in part, it’s released from this part of the stomach
here, what’s called the fundus which has been removed during surgery. So we’re
turning the stomach into a long, slender tube just like the sleeve of a shirt. That’s kind of how it gets its name. There’s not any plastic sleeve of
material though. So when we have done this surgery, this part of the stomach
over here now has no blood supply to it so we have to take that part of the
stomach out so that one part I mentioned – the fundus – is removed as well and so a
lot of patients that have the surgery will say, you know I don’t have a
constant hunger I used to feel beforehand. You’ll also notice that if
you follow the path that food goes well it’s going to go the exact same route
that it did before. We’re not rerouting the intestines so
the risk of vitamin deficiencies or malabsorption is significantly reduced
with this surgery compared to the gastric bypass. So essentially, what this
surgery does to be effective as it invokes
restriction. The amount of the stomach that we remove is about 80 to 85%
of the volume so patients who used to consume lots and lots of calories at one
sitting just aren’t physically able to do so because of the much smaller volume of the stomach. If you would like to learn more about other surgical weight
management options, watch the videos on adjustable gastric banding and roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

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