How to Treat SIBO – Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (3/3)

How to Treat SIBO – Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (3/3)


I’m Dr. Christopher Mote. Our clinic is
Cornerstone Health Community, and today is part three of our series on SIBO –
Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth. I encourage you to watch part 1 and 2
before you get to this one – it will make more sense. So here’s what we learned in
the first one – that the anatomy and physiology works like this: as undigested
or poorly-digested food moves through the intestine and dumps in the colon,
bacteria will overpopulate on that undigested food. They move into the small
bowel, and creates symptoms in the abdomen of bloating, gas, pain, loose
stools, hard stools. Maybe as bad, it also creates inflammation that causes leaky
gut through the small intestine itself, and then the inflammation produced by
all those bacteria – the toxins – go through the entire body: joints, brain, skin, fat
cells, all are inflamed now. So how do we deal with this? Well, first let me say
that I think we’re moving in the wrong direction as a functional medicine
profession if all we’re doing is breath testing, because that just confirms that
we have a problem. But underlying these issues are
pathogens. And many of our profession have not understood or moved in that
direction. I want to say that if we look for the underlying causes of the
inflammation within the gut, we’re gonna have better success treating SIBO, and
the diets don’t have to be quite so restrictive and the processes for curing don’t have to be so long. So here’s what I’m talking about. In our SIBO
patients, we find inflammation that set people up for this overgrowth because
we’re finding inflammation in the stomach that erodes stomach acid and motility
issues, and oftentimes it comes down to a bacterial infection called H. pylori. We
find that on a stool test using PCR or DNA detection. In this area,
we’ll find people who have sensitivity to gluten, and this is the number one
area that gets inflamed. It’s also one of the primaries for H. pylori to infect, and
the way this works is inflammation in this tissue short-circuits the hormone
signals to the pancreas as the food is passing by. The pancreas is supposed
to be signaled that there’s food on the way and release enzymes. When there’s
inflammation here, those signals never get to the pancreas, there’s very little
enzyme release. It’s not that we lack enzymes it’s that we have inflammation
blocking the signals to the pancreas. And so, commonly, we find H. pylori that causes
inflammation in this part of the tissues, gluten sensitivity, when somebody
continues to eat it, will reliably cause inflammation here. And then you can throw
in there a number of other parasites like Giardia, mold and yeast like Candida,
they all cause inflammation right there and anywhere throughout here. They
change the dynamics of motility, they create a hospitable
environment for this bacteria to thrive. And so in the past, we used to try to give
digestive enzymes, and we give fiber, and we give high dose probiotics. And people
felt great – as long as they took them. And as soon as they stopped, the
problem came back because we never addressed the root causes. Another approach,
if you have a prescribing doctor, is to take Xifaxan as a broad-spectrum
antibiotic. And sure, that will wipe out large numbers of all the bacteria, but it
does not kill H. pylori if you have it. It does not change the inflammation from
your foods. And it absolutely does not treat these other microorganisms. And so,
within six months to a year we found our patients coming back with the same
symptoms. So we don’t do a breath test, we do a stool test. We can confirm your
symptoms and the test line up that you have SIBO, but most importantly, we can
find out if it’s a microorganism, if it’s a food, or a combination that is causing
this type of overgrowth and motility, and we can treat it effectively in the span
of six months or less.

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