Healthy People eLearning Webinar: Reducing Childhood Obesity (Part 8 of 10)

Healthy People eLearning Webinar: Reducing Childhood Obesity (Part 8 of 10)


EMMELINE OCHIAI: The first question is for
Kari. The question is: Are the tools being discussed ready available for replication?
Specifically, will the Healthy Weight Plan for the school setting be available?
KARI ELLINGSTAD: Yeah, I think that’s on our website currently and if it’s not you
can email me and I would be glad to send it. With the school we include, we created a Healthy
Weight Plan for general use that has been offered to the broad school community and
many schools and some cases the principal sent out a letter to help that be completed.
And then we have also created an obesity-focused individual health plan like school nurses
implement for kids that have asthma, or diabetes, or those types of things. This one is focused
on obesity and again aligns with the 5210 message and it sort of dictates the work flow
that that our nurses follow when they work with a patient, or a student, that has obesity.
And they are encouraged to work with 6-8 students per school that are obese. But yes, we are
happy to share anything that we have created and are using and if it is not on the website
please feel free to email me. EMMELINE OCHIAI: Thank you, Kari. The next
question is for Shaila. Could you share where we can find evaluation data for the 5210 approach.
We would like to know where we can find evidence that this approach is effective.
SHAILA SERPAS: Yes, so thanks for that question. That was the exactly the question that all
10 teams at the table for our very first Healthy Weight Collaborative activity. We had several
of the NICHQ and HRSA expertise at the table and a binder of incredible resources and background
that was looked into. So I’m wondering if maybe some of that material — maybe NICHQ
can comment — if that’s available for public access. Because a lot of that was vetted before
we even arrived. Looking at messaging and effectiveness of messaging, not just 5210
but there’s a clock program in Chicago that has messaging as well. And many of these programs,
the one in Maine that we chose, has done some local research, not on a national level, that
we saw two years ago when we were looking and reviewing which messaging had the best
data to support its effectiveness and also how easy was it to implement in our own community.
So we considered those factors. And what we saw in the evidence for 5210 specifically
was that if the families that were surveyed — and they’ve published it, I can forward
the references that I recall reading, two published studies — one was regarding the
effectiveness of reaching the families with the messaging and could they recall it. So
that’s just a recalling ability of being exposed to the message, not an assessment of behavior
change. And what they found was that if the families were exposed in more than one setting
— so school and the business or in their doctor’s office — two settings, the likelihood
of their recall was much higher. And then the second one, which I think we’re
more apt to be interested in is not just that they can recall the message, but does it in
fact lead to behavior change, which has been, I think lacking in the evidence at that time.
There was really a paucity of material that we could see that really demonstrated behavior
change as a result of the messaging, but there was a small study that they did show us that
showed. And I’m thinking, I’m recalling now, and I might be wrong, but I’m thinking that
there was behavior change in consumption of fruits and vegetables in people that were
able to recall the message more clearly and perhaps a little bit higher physical activity
level. So I would have to forward those references for you, but there was a small amount of data
again, like I said, at the local level and nothing at this national level at that time
and maybe we’ve moved forward on more evidence behind those messaging efforts since that
time. EMMELINE OCHIAI: Thank you so much, Shaila.
The next question is for Dr. Linde. How does the Healthy Weight Collaborative align with
other federal initiatives. SARAH LINDE: Well the Healthy Weight Collaborative
from the start was designed with other federal initiatives in mind and it was designed to
be complementary to work going on at CDC and that’s probably the primary agency that has
significant obesity initiatives. Of course we also aligned it with the First Lady’s Let’s
Move initiative and throughout the Collaborative in addition to the teams that you’ve heard
from today we’ve had lots of partners and stakeholders. So, partners within the federal
Department of Health and Human Services, from other federal departments, and with numerous
outside stakeholders. For example we’ve had a representative from the Let’s Move initiative
with us in the various meetings and planning. So what distinguishes this collaborative is
the focus on bringing together the primary care, public health, and the community using
the evidence base and then testing it through the Breakthrough Series model, revising things
and then moving on and of course the scale up and sustainability beyond that.

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