Hamilton County, Ohio — Obesity Prevention

Hamilton County, Ohio — Obesity Prevention


[music] Sen. Eric H. Kearny: I’m
a State Senator and I’m leading the
fight against childhood obesity
in my community. We’ve got a problem,
a very big problem. We’ve got one in three kids
who are obese. 33% of our population in Ohio
that is obese or grossly obese; and that is a precursor
to diabetes, heart disease and other
types of diseases. Tim Ingram: We can never become
complacent on this issue or we will never be able
to put the leading causes of death that are due to obesity
in the history books. David Martorano: Type two
diabetes is one of the most critical factors in terms of our
public health issues moving forward and it all stems from
the obesity epidemic. Stacy Wegley: The data is there. We know what the problem is,
we know how significant the obesity
problem is. Sen. Eric H. Kearny: One
of the schools that I visited; the
principals said we have three kids in each
class that is diabetic. Tim Ingram: We’ve got
a lot at stake. Chris Auffrey:
It’s critical. We need elected officials,
community leaders to recognize,
this is real. Stacy Wegley: We absolutely know
that there are some of our neighbors that are hit harder
than others. Where local fast food
is their only choice of food in that
neighborhood. Sen. Eric H. Kearny:
Food deserts, to me means, the inability
of someone to have access to healthy fruits
and vegetables. Stacy Wegley: We have lots of
neighborhood convenience stores, but we need to help those
business owners so that their business plan supports good
business and good health. Lauren Niemes: I want
every to have access to real, healthy, good food every single
day, no matter where they live. We are helping schools to set
standards for the kinds of foods they’ll sell outside
of school lunch to make sure that they’re healthy choices for kids. Sen. Eric H. Kearny:
We’ve implemented education tools or teaching tools into our schools and my
hope is that the kids will come home and change
the parents. Tim Ingram: Really in our
community we have barriers to participation in physical
activity. Stacy Wegley: They don’t feel
safe and in some cases they aren’t safe to turn their
children out to play in the street that game of kickball
or baseball or softball. Tim Ingram: The Y is providing
the access with subsidized memberships through our
Membership For All program; and start that process
of environmental change. Sen. Eric H. Kearny: The
We Thrive program has emphasized walking
to school or having kids ride their
bikes to school. Stacy Wegley: We want that child
to be able to walk down their sidewalk that connects
to the community park. Gates that we’ve opened through
shared use agreements. Environmental change is so
important to the community. Chris Auffrey: Parks often pay
for themselves. Well maintained, good parks will
generate higher property values in the areas surrounding
the parks. It’s sort of a win/win
situation. Stacy Wegley: This is going
to take all of us. From the decision a parent makes
at the grocery store to what are kids are eating
on the lunch line to what’s being served in the neighborhood. Sen. Eric H. Kearny:
It’s saying, hey let’s look at this from
a community standpoint, holistically
and let’s make changes throughout a particular community. Stacey Wegley: We’re working
from the grass roots, so every neighbor, every pastor, every
parent, ever principal, every physician has
a role to play. Tim Ingram: It’s really about
bringing the community together to really affect environmental
change for our community focused around healthy lifestyles. We need to have the healthy
choice be the easy choice. Stacey Wegley: We know what
works we just need to have the courage to get it done. [music]

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