Celiac Artery/Trunk – Part 1 – Anatomy Tutorial

Celiac Artery/Trunk – Part 1 – Anatomy Tutorial


Okay, so this is a tutorial on the celiac
artery. So I’m going to talk you through the various branches of the celiac artery in this
tutorial. I’m just going to get rid of the venous system
and we’ll just look at the arterial system. We’ll focus in on the celiac artery. So we’re
looking now just at the arterial system and we’re focusing on the abdominal section of
the aorta. The celiac trunk is the first anterior branch
of the abdominal aorta, which supplies the foregut structures. It’s just after the aorta
perforates the diaphragm at the level of the upper border of the L1 vertebra. So I’ve just brought some other structures
in for reference. You can see the aorta piercing the diaphragm and the celiac trunk just after
this point. This is at the level of the upper border of lumber vertebra L1. So the celiac trunk has three branches. You’ve
got the left gastric branch, which is this branch here going upwards. And then you’ve
got the splenic branch, the splenic artery coming off going towards the spleen to the
left. And you’ve got the common hepatic artery. So those are the three branches that come
off the celiac trunk. So the celiac artery, for some reason, on this model, it’s in blue.
I can’t change that unfortunately, but it is meant to be red here, so just try and ignore
that. So if I zoom in a little further, you might
be wondering what these two little arteries here are. These are actually the inferior
phrenic arteries. Their origin is very variable. So they can arise above the celiac trunk or
they can arise from a common trunk either above the origin of the celiac artery or from
the celiac artery itself. So these are the inferior phrenic artery which supply the diaphragm
and they have a variable origin. So ignore these for this tutorial. We’re just
going to focus on the branches, the left gastric, the splenic and the common hepatic artery. So now I’m just going to switch over to some
nice diagram to illustrate the branching of these branches. Just to orientate a bit, we’re
looking at the abdominal aorta as it’s just passed through the diaphragm and we’ve got
the celiac trunk coming off immediately after that. And you can see it’s three branches
— the left gastric, the splenic and the common hepatic. To the right, we’ve got a dissected liver.
So we’ve got a little bit of the left lobe of the liver up here and the gallbladder is
revealed because the liver has been pulled away. On the left, we’ve got the spleen and
we’ve got the inferior vena cava system to the right of the aorta. So first, we’ll talk about the left gastric
artery. So we’ve got the celiac trunk here and the first artery coming off here is this
artery called the left gastric. This artery ascends and it continues upwards here and
gives off esophageal branches to the distal part of the esophagus. And then you can see how the artery then sharply
curves around like this. It runs along the lesser curvature of the stomach and it gives
off these branches which supply the surface of the stomach. So the left gastric artery gives off this
little branch here. And you can see this anastomoses with another branch here. So the word anastomose just means ‘joins together’.
So this artery another artery essentially, which comes off another part of the branch
of the celiac artery. You could probably guess the name of this
artery. This is the right gastric artery and this anastomoses with the left gastric artery
to form this nice little arch, which sits on the surface of the lesser curvature of
the stomach and the right gastric artery comes off the common hepatic artery or the proper
hepatic artery. It’s fairly variable in its origin. So fairly straightforward so far. The left
gastric artery is the smallest branch and it ascends upwards and gives off esophageal
branches, which supply the distal esophagus and then it curves around on the lesser curvature
of the stomach and anastomoses with the right gastric artery, which comes off the common
hepatic artery, which I’ll come on to talk about. So I’ve shown you the vessels which run along
the lesser curvature of the stomach, but you can also see that there’s a vessel here which
runs along the greater curvature of the stomach. So like the vessel, which runs along the lesser
curvature, this vessel is composed of two vessels which anastomose. The first vessel I’m going to talk about is
the left gastroepiploic artery and this comes off the splenic artery, which is the next
branch of the celiac trunk. So what I’m going to do is we’re going to
switch to another diagram now and we’re going to flip the stomach up. we’re going to take
the stomach and flip it over to the top and we’re going to look at the splenic artery
and we’ll be able to see the pancreas below. So we’ve just flipped the stomach up and this
is the posterior surface of the stomach. And just to orientate again, left gastric artery
coming off and you can see its sharp curve round with this branch that runs along the
lesser curvature anastomosing with the right gastric artery coming off the common hepatic
or the proper hepatic. And then we’ve got the splenic artery and
it’s got this long tortuous course. You can see this vessel given off called the left
gastroepiploic artery, which is what we saw in the previous diagram running along the
greater curvature. So remember the stomach is flipped up so the greater curvature is
up here. So just like the left gastric and the right
gastric artery which anastomose on the inferior curvature of the stomach, the left gastroepiploic
artery anastomoses with the right gastroepiploic artery, which comes of the gastroduodenal
branch, which I’ll talk about soon. And hopefully, it will all come together and be clear. So the splenic artery is the largest branch
of the celiac trunk. You can see it’s got this long tortuous course and it runs along
the top of the pancreas. And you can see these little branches given off to the pancreas.
And these little branches supply the neck, the body and the tail of the pancreas. The
head has a different supply, which I’ll show you in a moment. So just before the splenic artery enters the
hilum of the spleen, it gives off some short vessels which are called the short gastric
arteries. And this supplies the fundus of the stomach. So you can see these vessels
coming off here and this area of the stomach, the fundus. We’ve got the splenic artery with its branches
supplying the neck, the body and the tail of the pancreas. And then just before it enters
the hilum of the spleen, we’ve got the short gastric arteries, which supply the fundus
of the stomach. And then we’ve got this branch given off called
the left gastroepiploic artery. And this anastomoses with the right gastroepiploic artery. It runs
along the greater curvature of the stomach.

35 thoughts on “Celiac Artery/Trunk – Part 1 – Anatomy Tutorial

  1. Well organized and great tutorial, your videos are supplementing my graduate level anatomy courses for physical therapy well. As a visual learner I appreciate your time and work. Thank you.

  2. wonderful and free on you tube! better than any book I have seen. and he has a pleasant voice to learn from long term! want to learn more! Thanks Jack!

  3. Thanks for the video. I was just diagnosed with celiac artery compression syndrome after years of severe health issues and am going in for surgery next week and this helps put in perspective what my surgeon has already told me

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